Thursday, October 7, 2010

Mora - The Best Knives You've Never Heard Of

Have you guys heard of Mora? No, it's not a girl's name, it's a knife company from Sweden. Actually, the proper name of the company is Mora of Sweden. If you haven't heard of them, then you're not alone. Many people haven't. It's unfortunate, really, because Mora knives are some of the best value for the money to be found.

A Little Personal History

Before I go any further, I want to share some personal history. My first encounter with a Mora knife was actually many years ago. I was in Fourth grade on a trip with my family to Colorado. It was my first time in Colorado and I remember admiring how beautiful that place was.

We were walking through town, Estes Park, I believe, and we walked into a knife shop. They had a bunch of really nice knives that I was admiring. My dad walks up to me and asks if I wanted one. Well, after trying to figure out which one I wanted, I finally made my decision. It was a smaller fixed blade knife, with a blade that was about 4 inches long. It had a nice, wooden handle and a leather sheath. I loved it. That was the first knife that I had ever gotten and I still have it.
The actual Mora Classic Scout 40 that I received.

During the next week or so that I was still in Colorado, I used it to sharpen sticks and various other things. I would wear it on my belt. I couldn't be happier.

Well fast forward to about 2 years ago, I was looking at that knife. The blade has tarnished a bit since I got it, due to the fact that it is made of carbon steel. I noticed the roll-mark on the blade and saw a familiar name. The roll-mark reads "Mora - Sweden". Wow, I've had a Mora every since I was young boy. I recently looked up the knife and it's still being made. It's called the Mora Classic Scout 40. So my experience with Mora knives goes all the way back to my childhood. They were great knives then and they still are great knives today.

What makes Mora knives so great?

Like I mentioned, Mora knives are an amazing value for the money. Most Mora knives cost less than $20, but quality of the knife that you get is comparable to $40-60 blades, if not more.

Mora knives, at least all that I have come across, all feature razor-sharp blades. Their factory edges are excellent. All of their knives that I have seen also come in what is known as a Scandinavian grind. A Scandinavian grind is a way in which the knife is ground down, where there is only one angle from the flat of the blade all the way to the edge. Most knives actually have two beveled parts, where there is one angle that goes towards the edge, and then, right next to the knife edge, there is a secondary, steeper angle that makes up the knife edge. Blades with a Scandinavian grind have a stronger edge due to the strong edge geometry that the grind offers. They are good for heavy chopping tasks, thus are a choice among bushcrafters and outdoor enthusiasts.

The blades on Mora knives are really incredible. To keep their prices low, however, Mora saves money on the sheaths and knife handles, which are commonly made out of polymer on the less expensive knife models. This does not make a Mora knife weak for normal use, but it does mean that you can't go pounding on a Mora knife as you would on a knife with a full tang. For all practical reasons, if you understand what a Mora knife can and cannot do, I would rather have an amazing blade and factory edge at the expense of strength, since you most likely will not be using a Mora for heavy chopping, but rather for more intricate work.

What are some Mora knives that I recommend.

Well, I haven't really seen a Mora knife that I haven't liked. I'm being honest here, they are just really functional, sharp knives.

The Mora 2000 is one of the nicest budget knives that Mora offers.
Out of the knives that I have had experience with, the Mora 2000 series is excellent. It's got an interesting blade design, a great polymer handle with a textured rubber grip area and a functional polymer sheath. The blade is made out of a heat-treated stainless steel that is very strong and resistant to tarnishing.

One of the most comfortable Moras, the Clipper 860 MG.
My next recommendation is the Mora 860 MG. This knife is from the Clipper series. It also has a polymer handle with a textured rubber grip area, but the shape of the grip differs from the Mora 2000. It has a nice, drop point blade and comes razor sharp. The blade is made out of the same type of stainless steel as the Mora 2000. The sheath is made out of polymer.

The Mora Classic 612 is a very functional, fixed blade.
If you are looking for a more traditional type of design, the Mora 612 Classic is a great choice. It has a red birchwood handle. It's blade is made out of a carbon steel, so it is stronger than the stainless steel that Mora offers, although it is prone to tarnishing. The sheath is also made out of polymer.

So those are just some of the knives that I have had more experience with. I'm sure that there are other great Mora knives out there. If you haven't yet, take a look at a Mora. You'll be surprised with what you get.

12 comments:

  1. That last Mora is just like the one I own, except mine is without the training whee--I mean finger guard. They're terrific knives! Now I'll have to write a review on my blog to attempt to defend the version that comes without the guard.

    Reason #1: It's what the real Scandinavians swear by!

    Look out in the next few weeks for a full review of the Mora Classic No. 1 on http://knifereviewcenter.blogspot.com/ and decide for yourself!

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  2. I just inherited a KJ Eriksson and I am looking for a sheath for it as the one that came with it is old and cracked. Any recommendations?

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  3. These knives are well-known and loved among knife nuts. Go to bladeforums.com and start a thread about Moras and see what happens. :)

    They're popular among bushcrafters thanks to guys like Mors Kochanski, Ray Mears and Cody Lundin.

    To Thorn1001, again, post at bladeforums. The folks there can make sheath recommendations.

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  4. One best classic knives!!
    Thank you Sir, I am also a big fan in collection of knives and having a website of my own. Link is:- http://netknives.com/

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  5. I have the Mora 749 8 All round stainless model and need to say it is a flat out brute in the field or at home. I really bring home the bacon with this blade working at a nearby shop cutting meats, breads, and cheeses. Have taken this blade into the forested areas amid my yearly 75 mile exploring excursion through the rough Ozarks, and this blade has not fizzled me once for any errand I have tossed before it. I can sincerely say that I will NEVER be purchasing whatever other brand of blade again 10/5 stars well done Mora!

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  6. Knifesharpenerguide2 was so kind as to steal my post at another website. http://www.thetruthaboutknives.com/2013/06/knife-review-mora-748-long-clip/ please be wary of this commenter.

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  7. I've never wanted another knife since I found out about Mora a few years ago.

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  8. Great content!
    Greetings from http://www.bestchineseknives.com/
    Cheers!

    ReplyDelete